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The Dangers of Staph & "The SuperBug" MRSA:
The Basics

By Keith Allen

There is so much information on this topic it can be overwhelming.
So I wrote this article to help sort through the confusion.

If you have never contracted the harmful bacteria know as Staph or MRSA,
Consider yourself lucky. According the CDC, bacterial infections are on the
Rise in the United States.


WHAT IS STAPH / MRSA?

Staph or "Staphylococcus Aureus" is a bacterium that is carried on the skin, inside the nose and under the nails. This can be treated with your basic antibiotics.

MRSA, which stands for "Methicillin - Resistant Staph Aureus" has the same symptoms as
Staph, but is resistant to most antibiotics and harder to treat. This is why it is
known as the "Super Bug".

These bacterial infections can start and look as harmless as a pimple, or in most cases it may
look like a small spider bite. Over a period of time it will begin to become red and irritated.
The infection will develop puss within the wound causing swelling. And left untreated can cause
flu like symptoms, and in severe cases even death.

If you feel you may have a Staph infection or MRSA, DO NOT try to "Pop" or drain the
infection. That will only make it worse and the infection will spread.
This must be treated by a health professional in a sterile environment.


TRANSMISSION
:

These infections are caused by bacteria that can be picked up anywhere. Through a small cut,
or even something as simple as touching a door handle, or even a shopping cart at the
supermarket. Other contributing factors are skin to skin contact in sports, gyms and locker
room showers, or sharing grooming products such as razors, towels, or poor hygiene.
Also those who do self-injections of any kind need to use the correct precautions
Before any self-injections.


TREATMENT:

Whether you are diagnosed as Staph or MRSA,
Seek a healthcare provider immediately.

From my experience and doctor opinions as of 2013,
In most cases, they will "Lance" or cut the wound to drain out the infection.
The doctor will probably take a sample of the discharge for a culture to determine if you have
Staph or MRSA.

And if it has spread too deep into the tissue they will "Pack" it with gauze, which is usually
removed the next day. Then the exposed area will heal from the inside out.

While healing, it is important to keep this covered, for risk of contaminating others. You will also
be put on the proper antibiotic. This is usually for a period of 2 weeks depending on the severity
of the infection. Most likely if needed you will also be prescribed a mild pain killer. 

In some cases your doctor may prescribe "HIBICLENS",
Which is a liquid soap that kills germs on contact. It is stronger than any antibacterial soap and
can be used during healing and prevention.
This can be bought over the counter.

And in the event of a recurrence, they may take a nose culture to make sure you're not
"a carrier" which means you still have a lingering infection. If this is the case they will most likely
also prescribe a cream that can be applied right "under" the outside of your nose and will help
Kill off the remaining harmful bacteria as you breathe in the medicine.   


PREVENTION:

Always wash your hands!
This is the first key to prevention. Try to use antibacterial soap, and use other products such as Purell, or any other hand sanitizer.

Besides the nose, bacteria accumulate under the nails. If you have long nails be sure
To give that area extra attention when washing.

TRY TO KEEP ANY CUTS COVERED AND
CLEAN UNTIL HEALED.

NEVER SHARE RAZORS OR TOWELS.
And if you or another in the household has been infected, DO NOT use the same soap.
The bacteria can also be transferred this way.

The best product to kill bacteria on objects is diluted bleach with water.
You can get a cheap spray bottle for a buck at the dollar store.    

NEVER USE BLEACH ON YOUR SKIN!

But there are alternative products you can use if diluted bleach is not an option for certain
objects, but remember nothing is a more powerful disinfectant. Especially when cleaning your bathtub.
 
But for some products such as computer keyboards, or your cell phone, I recommend wiping
them down with Rubbing Alcohol. Don't forget doors and refrigerator handles, these are also a breeding ground for bacteria.

And when washing clothes and bedding, wash your clothes in HOT WATER and dry on HIGH HEAT.
Or wash in hot water then allow to hang dry.


DISCLAIMER:

THESE ARE JUST OPINIONS OF THE AUTHOR.
CONTACT YOUR PHYSICIAN FOR ANY MEDICAL
ADVICE AND/OR ASSISTANCE.

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